Thursday
Mar312011

Phandroid says Riptide GP is the best game at CTIA!

The good folks at Phandroid have called Riptide GP the best Android game at the International CTIA Wireless show in Orlando last week.

It’s so graphically rich and too much fun to put down. The physics in this game are looking great and it isn’t even ready for primetime yet. 

Nice!  The build he played didn't even have stunting in it yet.  And let me tell you, the stunting is fuuuuunnn. 

Read the whole article to find out about the other great showings, including the new HTC 3D phone and more:

Phandroid:  Best of CTIA Wireless 2011

Tuesday
Mar292011

Riptide GP details stunting mechanic in Pocket Gamer preview

Our friends over at Pocket Gamer UK have run a preview of Riptide GP that offers some tantalizing new details about the game and a couple of exclusive new screenshots.

The biggest new announcement about Riptide GP's gameplay is stunting as a core part of the game mechanic.  Here's how it works:

Every race track in Riptide GP features lots of opportunities for grabbing huge air.  Not just ramps, but massive rolling waves that -- if you catch them just right -- vault you high above the track.  When you're in the air, you can use swipe gestures on the tablet or phone screen to pull off tricks like Superman, Can-Can, flips and tabletops.  Pull the trick off successfully before landing and you earn boost.  Splash into the water mid-trick and...well, the results are painful.

Check out the Pocket Gamer article for more info and screenshots!

Thursday
Mar102011

Presentation: The Language of Game Environments

Back in December, Creative Director Matt Small flew out to Washington DC to talk about "The Language of Game Environments" to a group of government and university researchers.

The Game Changers conference was hosted by the University of Maryland Center for Advanced Study of Language (CASL) and the Foreign Service Institute (FSI).  Attendees were mostly language-learning researchers interested in finding ways to use video games to aid in education and language acquisition.

Matt's presentation is a high-level overview of how game environments have changed during the last 30 years, and explores some of the techniques environment modelers and level designers use to guide players through these increasingly complex 3D spaces and interactions.

The presentation slides and video have now been posted on the CASL website.  The video of the full 45-minute presentation and Q&A is here.  If you're watching the video you may find it helpful to grab the PDF first, since you can't see many of the slides in the video. You can download the presentation PDF file here.

Also, the full roster of presentations are here:  Game Changers Roundtable.  

Particularly good are Brian Upton's presentation on how designers use and manipulate player anticipation, Mark Dank's on the changing game audience and how it's affected the industry, and Sarah Stocker's on the virtuous cycle of addiction in games.   Keep in mind the audience here are all non-gamers, so some of this stuff may be a little "introductory" for the hardest of the hard-core, but it's all interesting stuff.  You may also want to check out David Traum's presentation on the university research going on around natural language simulation.

Friday
Feb252011

Interview: Vector Unit on what it takes to run an indie studio

Steve Conger at The Gamesman posted a great interview with Vector Unit's Matt Small and Ralf Knoesel.

Get a behind the scenes look at the development of Riptide GP and Hydro Thunder Hurricane, and learn a little more about the indie game development roller coaster.

It's really a pleasure for us to talk with someone like Steve who's genuinely interested in the process of game development.  Hopefully this discussion can give people thinking of starting their own business a little more insight into what it takes and how to go about it.

Link:  Special Edition Riptide GP/Vector Unit Interview

 

Thursday
Feb242011

Riptide GP teaser trailer is out

The first ever HD video of Riptide GP live gameplay is now out and about on YouTube and elsewhere.  

This is the reason we decided to make this game for Tegra 2.  Notice the shiny hydro jets and the realtime reflections on the water.  Marvel at the procedural wave simulations.  Ooh and ahh over the multipass shaders.  

But most of all please enjoy the sweetness.

Not too bad for a phone/tablet game, right?